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About IEEE

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a professional association with its corporate office in New York City and its operations center in Piscataway, New Jersey. It was formed in 1963 from the amalgamation of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and the Institute of Radio Engineers. Today it is the world's largest association of technical professionals with more than 400,000 members in chapters around the world. Its objectives are the educational and technical advancement of electrical and electronic engineering, telecommunications, computer engineering and allied disciplines.

 

Meaning of I-E-E-E

IEEE stands for the "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers". The association is chartered under this full legal name. IEEE's membership has long been composed of engineers and scientists. Allied professionals who are members include computer scientists, software developers, information technology professionals, physicists, and medical doctors, in addition to IEEE's electrical and electronics engineering core. For this reason the organization no longer goes by the full name, except on legal business documents, and is referred to simply as IEEE.
The IEEE is dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence. It has about 425,000 members in about 160 countries, slightly less than half of whom reside in the United States.

 

History
The major interests of the AIEE were wire communications (telegraphy and telephony) and light and power systems. The IRE concerned mostly radio engineering, and was formed from two smaller organizations, the Society of Wireless and Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute. With the rise of electronics in the 1930s, electronics engineers usually became members of the IRE, but the applications of electron tube technology became so extensive that the technical boundaries differentiating the IRE and the AIEE became difficult to distinguish. After World War II, the two organizations became increasingly competitive, and in 1961, the leadership of both the IRE and the AIEE resolved to consolidate the two organizations. The two organizations formally merged as the IEEE on January 1, 1963.

Notable presidents of IEEE and its founding organizations include Elihu Thomson (AIEE, 1889–1890), Alexander Graham Bell (AIEE, 1891–1892), Charles Proteus Steinmetz (AIEE, 1901–1902), Lee De Forest (IRE, 1930), Frederick E. Terman (IRE, 1941), William R. Hewlett (IRE, 1954), Ernst Weber (IRE, 1959; IEEE, 1963), and Ivan Getting (IEEE, 1978).

Impact Factor: Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from a journal published in the past two years have been cited in the JCR year. The Impact Factor is a so-called popularity measure which relies on the crude number of citations, each of them counting the same independently of the quality of the source.

Eigen Factor Score:  takes into account the number of times articles from a journal published in the last five years have been cited in the JCR year while also considering which journals have contributed these citations. Since citations are in this case weighted dependently on the source, The Eigen Factor Score belongs to the class of so-called prestige measures. The Eigen Factor Score represents the probability of reading a specific journal in the entire collection and therefore high-scoring journals have a greater influence in the scientific community.

Article Influence Score:  is also a prestige measure and has all the features of the Eigen Factor Score, with an additional normalization to the number of published papers. Hence it can be considered the average influence of a journal's articles over the first five years after publication.

 

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